Mar 20

Space Rocket History #294 – Space 1970 – Soyuz 9 – Part 2

At midnight June 1, 1970 Soyuz 9 lifted off from Area 31 at Baikonur and successfully entered low earth orbit with an apogee of 227 km and a perigee of 176 km.

Mar 13

Space Rocket History #293 – Space 1970 – Soyuz 9 – Part 1

The original Soyuz 9 mission was planned to fly two Soyuz spacecraft in the August to September 1970 time frame for a rendezvous and docking; however, at the end of December 1969 the communist party bosses ordered that the mission be changed to a single spacecraft on a 20 day long duration flight to be launched in April 1970 to coincide with Lenin’s birthday.

Mar 06

Space Rocket History #292 – Space 1970 – Venera 7

The VENERA 7 lander was the hardiest of the Soviet Venus probes yet built. Its creators wanted the vessel to land on the planet’s surface in working order.

Feb 27

Space Rocket History #291 – Space 1970 – Luna 16 & 17

Luna 16 was the first robotic probe to land on the Moon and return a sample of lunar soil to Earth after five unsuccessful similar attempts.

Feb 20

Space Rocket History #290 – Apollo 13 – Welcome Home

“Three brave astronauts are alive and on Earth because of the mission operations teams’ dedication, and because at the critical moments the people of that team were wise enough and self-possessed enough to make the right decisions. Their extraordinary feat is a tribute to man’s ingenuity, to his resourcefulness and to his courage.” President Richard Nixon

Feb 13

Space Rocket History #289 – Apollo 13 – Splashdown

“During blackout every team member does his own soul searching, reviewing the decisions and the data, knowing they had to be nearly perfect and knowing how tough perfection is.” Gene Kranz

Feb 06

Space Rocket History #288 – Apollo 13 – Re-entry

To Kranz and his team, this crew was special. They just could not lose them.  Failure was not an option.

Jan 30

Space Rocket History #287 – Apollo 13 – Separation Anxiety

Three hours before dawn, Gene Kranz’ White Team took its place next to Windler’s Maroon Team controllers. The eighty hours of uncertainty were now past and mission control was down to Apollo 13’s final shift.