May 23

Space Rocket History #255 – Apollo 12 – Lunar Liftoff

After a total of 31.6 hours on the moon, the Lunar Module ascent stage fired for about 7 minutes placing Intrepid into an orbit of 10 miles by 54 miles.

Post EVA 2 checklist

Pan view out of Intrepid’s windows

Post EVA Cabin Cleanup Checklist

May 16

An Encore Presentation of the Space Rocket History #122 – Apollo: Serious Problems with the Lunar Module and Grumman

Toward the end of January 1967, it was revealed that Lunar Module 1 would not reach the Cape in February, as expected. This meant, the moon landing might be delayed because the lander was not ready. But the mission planners could not wait for the Apollo engineers to iron out all the problems. They had to plan for a landing in 1969 and hope that the hardware would catch up with them.

Lunar Module Diagram

Lunar Module Diagram

John Disher Explains the Components of the Apollo Program

John Disher Explains Apollo Components

Lunar Module Test Article LTA-2R

Lunar Module Test Article LTA-2R

May 09

Space Rocket History #254 – Apollo 12 – Moonwalk 2 – Part 5 – Blocky Crater & Closeout

Conrad and Bean now walked north, up Surveyor Crater’s 14 degree slope. Fatigue set in as Pete and Al walked up the crater wall. The hand tool carrier was nearly full of rocks now and Bean felt the full weight of it.

Partial Panorama of Blocky Crater with LM in the background

“Fun is Wherever You Find it” by Al Bean

Back inside Intrepid

May 02

Space Rocket History #253 – Apollo 12 – Moonwalk 2 – Part 4 – Surveyor Crater & Surveyor 3

Surveyor 3 was now to their right, 300 feet away, gleaming in the morning sunlight. Antennas and sensors still reached upward from its tubular frame, just as they had on April 20, 1967, when the spacecraft thumped onto the moon amid blasts from its braking rockets.

Approaching Surveyor 3 with LM in background

“The Fabulous Photo We Never Took.” by Alan Bean

Al Bean, Surveyor 3, and Intrepid

Apr 25

An Encore Presentation of Space Rocket History #145 – Surveyors 2 – 7 with a Little Apollo 12

The primary objectives of the Surveyor program, were to support the Apollo landings by: (1) developing and validating the technology for landing softly on the Moon; (2) providing data on the compatibility of the Apollo design with conditions encountered on the lunar surface; and (3) adding to the scientific knowledge of the Moon.

Surveyor 3 with parts identified

Surveyor 3 with parts identified

Surveyor 4 launch

Surveyor 4 launch

The northwest wall of the Surveyor 5 crater

The northwest wall of the Surveyor 5 crater

Surveyor 6 on the plains of Sinus Medii

Surveyor 6 on the plains of Sinus Medii

Photomosaic of a panorama taken by Surveyor 7

Photomosaic of a panorama taken by Surveyor 7

Apollo 12 Astronauts visit Surveyor 3

Apollo 12 Astronauts visit Surveyor 3

Apr 18

Space Rocket History #252 – Apollo 12 – Moonwalk 2 – Part 3 – Rock ‘n’ Roll at Halo Crater

The problem with running into the sun was it was so bright that Conrad and Bean could not see the moon’s surface features until they were right on top of them.

EVA 2 Traverse Map

Conrad’s photo of Bean on the way to Halo Crater

Rock ‘n’ Roll on the Ocean of Storms by Alan Bean

Apr 11

Space Rocket History #251 – Apollo 12 – Moonwalk 2 – Part 2 – Bench and Sharp Craters

While Conrad led the way, Bean watched the ground for something interesting. It wasn’t easy to do field geology while running, and on the moon.

Bench Crater

Apollo 12 Preliminary Science Report

Sharp Crater. 1200 feet from the LM.

 

Apr 04

Space Rocket History #250 – Apollo 12 – Moonwalk 2 – Part 1 – Head Crater – Tang Ceremony

Pete and Al could not hear the excited shouts of the geologists in the back room down the hall from mission control, but they knew they had found something significant.

Intrepid’s hammocks for sleeping.

Edited traverse map for moonwalk 2. Changes are in black ink.

Gnomon setup at Head Crater. Notice the lighter colored soil that was turned over.