Mar 21

Space Rocket History #248 – Apollo 12 – Moonwalk 1 – Part 2 – ALSEP

According to the checklist, Bean was allowed 5 minutes to gain his balance and learn to walk on the Moon. Bean was amazed at his new buoyancy saying, “You can jump up in the air…”  But Conrad wanted to press on saying, “Hustle, boy, hustle! We’ve got a lot of work to do.”

TV camera pointed at the sun

Bean carrying the ALSEP

EVA 1 cuff checklist

Mar 14

Space Rocket History #247 – Apollo 12 – Moonwalk 1 – Part 1

“The old Surveyor, yes sir. It can’t be any more than 600 feet from here. How about that?” (Pete Conrad.)

Conrad on the LM ladder

Al Bean on the porch

Al Bean on the footpad

Mar 07

Space Rocket History #246 – Apollo 12 – Pin Point Landing Part 2 – Right Down the Middle of the Road

“Hey, there it is! There it is! Son of a gun, right down the middle of the road! Look out there! I can’t believe it! Fantastic!”  Pete Conrad when he saw his landing site.

From l to r, director of flight operations Chris Kraft, and flight director Gerry Griffin

Jerry Carr, capcom for Apollo 12 Lunar landing

Landing of Intrepid

Feb 21

Space Rocket History #244 – Apollo 12 – Lunar Orbit

At 83 hours mission elapsed time, the long lunar coast was almost over. It was time for the lunar orbit insertion burn. This burn would put Yankee Clipper and Intrepid into lunar orbit.

Earthrise from Apollo 12

Apollo 12 – Snowman landing site

Rough Moon topography

Feb 14

Space Rocket History #243 – Apollo 12 – TLI and the Coast

It was impossible to check out the entire spacecraft; that could only be done on the ground. In the short time available, Griffin’s team ran a pre-maneuver check list, re-aligned the CSM platform, and discussed proceeding with the mission with the crew.

Apollo 12 in Earth orbit

Apollo 12 CM docking with LM

Apollo 12 leaving Earth

Feb 07

Space Rocket History #242 – Apollo 12 – The Launch Part 2

John Aaron’s (EECOM) next call made him a legend in Mission Control. He said quickly and confidently, “Flight, try S-C-E to Aux.”

Lighting strikes Apollo 12

The lightning bolt that struck Apollo 12 aloft also hit the crane and platform of the mobile launch pad

John Aaron, the environmental control engineer (EECOM) for Apollo 12 launch

Jan 31

Space Rocket History #241 – Apollo 12 – The Launch Part 1

It was 68 degrees, overcast, and raining at Cape Kennedy on November 14, 1969. The ceiling was 2,100 feet and the winds were light. There was some discussion, while the astronauts were suiting-up, of scrubbing the launch, but that would mean ramping this whole thing down, draining every drop of fuel out of the Saturn, and sitting on their hands for a twenty-eight-day hold.

Pres. Nixon at the Apollo 12 launch

Crew on the way to the launch pad

Launch of Apollo 12

Jan 17

An Encore Presentation of Space Rocket History #188 – Apollo 10 – Command Module Pilot John Young

John Young enjoyed the longest career of any astronaut thus far. Over the course of 42 years of active NASA service he made six space flights and is the only person to have piloted, and been commander of four different classes of spacecraft: Gemini, the Apollo Command/Service Module, the Apollo Lunar Module, and the Space Shuttle.

John Young training in the CM simulator

John Young training in the CM simulator

John Young looking at the flight plan

John Young looking at the flight plan

John Young suiting up

John Young suiting up