Oct 04

Space Rocket History #226 – Apollo 11 – Moon Launch

Until now they had been focused on reaching the moon, landing, taking a walk on its surface, setting up experiments, exploring, and gathering evidence. With those tasks completed and their lunar bounty was board, the top priority was to fly back to Earth.

Rear of the LM ascent stage with Earth beyond

Buzz after his moonwalk

Rocketdyne’s artist concept of the Apollo 11 LM ascent stage launched from the surface of the moon

Sep 06

Space Rocket History #223 – Apollo 11 – Moonwalk – Part 1

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Silently and carefully, Armstrong raised his left boot over the lip of the footpad and lowered it to the dust. Immediately he tested his weight, bouncing in the gentle gravity, and when he felt firm ground, he was still, one foot on the last vestige of earthly things, the other on the moon. Then he spoke:

“That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

Armstrong descending the ladder

Neil on the footpad, about to step on the moon

Buzz descending the ladder

Aug 30

Space Rocket History #222 – Apollo 11 – Post Landing & EVA Prep

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Inside the Eagle Buzz and Neil knew every second was crucial. The T1 time was only 2 minutes so They hastily ran down through their checklists, preparing as though they were going to lift off within the two-minute window.

Animated gif of LM shadow before and after landing

Panoramic view of the landing site before and after the Moon walk

Moon suit

 

Jun 07

Space Rocket History #211 – Apollo 11 – Mission Training – Part 3 & Contamination

In addition to the fixed-base lunar module simulators in Houston and at the Cape, astronauts also practiced at Langley Research Center on the suspended lunar landing trainer which was equipped with realistic surface views and lighting.

Aldrin practices setting up Solar Wind experiment

Armstrong practices opening a lunar sample box

1/6 gravity harness to practice moon walking

Apr 05

Space Rocket History #203 – Apollo 11 – Command Module Pilot Michael Collins

The turning point for Michael Collins in his decision to become an astronaut was the Mercury Atlas 6 flight of John Glenn on February 20, 1962, and the thought of being able to circle the Earth in 90 minutes.

Michael Collins, July 1969

Mike Collins in the CM simulator

Mike Collins suiting up for Apollo 11