Sep 23

Space Rocket History #348 – Apollo 15 – Traverse 3

“We pray for one last landing
On the globe that gave us birth;
Let us rest our eyes on the fleecy skies
And the cool, green hills of Earth.” Robert A. Heinlein

Sep 09

Space Rocket History #347 – Apollo 15 – Traverse 2-Part 2 – The Genesis Rock

Both men realized what they had discovered. The rock was almost entirely plagioclase. This was surely a chunk of anorthosite, a piece of the primordial crust, the Genesis Rock.

Aug 26

Space Rocket History #346 – Apollo 15 – Traverse 2-Part 1

Suddenly, Scott called out that the Rover was beginning to slide down the hill.  As the back wheels came off the ground, Scott quickly got back on to hold the rover down.

Aug 12

Space Rocket History #345 – Apollo 15 – The Lunar Rover & Traverse 1

The whole stripped-down rover weighed about 455 pounds on Earth but only 76 pounds on the moon and was built to carry 2 1/2 times its weight at a maximum speed of about 10 miles per hour.

Mar 25

Space Rocket History #335 – Impacts of Soyuz 11 on Future Soyuz, Salyut-1 & Apollo

It was decided that henceforth, cosmonauts would wear pressure suits for launch and the return to Earth. Also, a system was installed to automatically pump air into the descent module in the event of decompression.  Additionally, the ventilation valves were modified so a premature opening would cause them to re-close automatically.  Of course these changes meant the spacecraft could only accommodate two cosmonauts.

Mar 11

Space Rocket History #334 – Soyuz 11 – Death in Space

The recovery team quickly opened the hatch and were shocked to find the men motionless, as if asleep or unconscious.

Feb 26

Space Rocket History #333 – Soyuz 11 – Downfall & N1 Update

Volkov transmitted to Flight Control: “The hatch is not hermetically sealed! … What can we do? … What can we do?”

Feb 12

Space Rocket History #332 – Soyuz 11/Salyut 1 – The Fire & SRH 7th Year Celebration

Just before the start of another communication session, Volkov noticed a smell of smoke from somewhere at the rear of the station. As soon as communication with the ground was established, he reported:  “Aboard the station is ‘the curtain’!”