Oct 15

Space Rocket History #133 – Apollo 1: Plugs Out – Part 1 – The Fire

The “Plugs Out” test scheduled for Jan 27, 1967 was not the first time that spacecraft 12 had been put through a simulated run with people on board…

Block I hatch consisted of two pieces and required pressure inside the cabin be no greater than atmospheric to open

Block I hatch consisted of two pieces and required pressure inside the cabin be no greater than atmospheric to open

The Apollo 1 crew enter their spacecraft in the altitude chamber at Kennedy Space Center, October 18, 1966

The Apollo 1 crew enter their spacecraft in the altitude chamber at Kennedy Space Center, October 18, 1966

Prime & backup crews 4/1/66. Backup crew Scott, McDivitt & Schweickart were replaced by Schirra, Eisele & Cunningham

Prime & backup crews 4/1/66. Backup crew Scott, McDivitt & Schweickart were replaced by Schirra, Eisele & Cunningham

Oct 08

Space Rocket History #132 – Apollo 1: Astronauts – Part 2 – Chaffee

“On my honor I will do my best, To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; To help other people at all times;  To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.” The Boy Scout Oath.

Chaffee in Mission Control for Gemini 3

Chaffee in Mission Control for Gemini 3

Chaffee with Apollo 1 Model

Chaffee with Apollo 1 Model

Apollo 1 Mission Patch

Apollo 1 Mission Patch

Oct 01

Space Rocket History #131 – Apollo 1: Astronauts – Part 1- Grissom & White

“So the reason I took those symbols was that I think this was the most important thing I had going for me, and I felt that while I couldn’t take one for every religion in the country, I could take the three I was most familiar with.”  Ed. White

Apollo 1 Crew Sketch

Apollo 1 Crew Sketch

Apollo 1 Crew

Apollo 1 Crew

Chaffee, White, and Grissom

Chaffee, White, and Grissom

Sep 24

Space Rocket History an Encore Presentation of Episode #27 – Mercury-Redstone 4 – Liberty Bell 7 with Gus Grissom

Mercury-Redstone 4 was the fourth mission in the Mercury-Redstone series and the second U.S. manned suborbital spaceflight. The mission was essentially a repeat of Alan Shepard’s Freedom 7 flight.   So why was it necessary to launch another sub-orbital mission?  Why not proceed with an orbital flight to match the Soviet Vostok 1?  Among other things the U.S. needed more space experience to corroborate the “Man-in-Space” concept.  Also the Redstone was the only booster NASA had that was approved for manned launches.  The Atlas booster was available but not ready.  Atlas was capable of putting a Mercury Capsule into orbit, but it had been launched three times with unmanned capsules, and it had exploded on 2 of the 3 attempts.

MR-4 Launch

MR-4 Launch

Gus Grissom

Gus Grissom

1137px-Grissom_prepares_to_enter_Liberty_Bell_7_61-MR4-76

Ready to Go

MR-4 Hatch

MR-4 Hatch

513px-Grissom_lifted_from_water_61-MR4-82

Rescue

Liberty Bell 7

Liberty Bell 7

Sep 17

Space Rocket History #130 – Apollo 1: Preparation

While flight-preparation crews were having problems, Grissom, White, and Chaffee were finding bottlenecks in training activities. The chief problem was keeping the Apollo mission simulator current with changes being made in spacecraft 012.

Command and Service Modules 012 at North American

Command and Service Modules 012 at North American

Apollo 1 Arrives at the Cape

Apollo 1 Arrives at the Cape

Grissom, Chaffee, & White check the communications headgear

Grissom, Chaffee, & White check the communications headgear

Aug 13

Space Rocket History #125 – Apollo: Astronaut Selection and Training – Part 3

“Some of those guys came in figuring, “I’ll write my textbooks and my thesis and teach [university courses] and I’ll come by twice a week and be an astronaut.” Well, that didn’t work …. We were devoting our lives to this whole thing, and you couldn’t devote anything less, I don’t care what your discipline was.”

Back, Swigert, Pogue, Evans, Weitz, Irwin, Carr, Roosa, Worden, Mattingly, Lousma. Front, Givens, Mitchell, Duke, Lind, Haise, Engle, Brand, Bull, McCandless

Back, Swigert, Pogue, Evans, Weitz, Irwin, Carr, Roosa, Worden, Mattingly, Lousma. Front, Givens, Mitchell, Duke, Lind, Haise, Engle, Brand, Bull, McCandless

Aug 05

Space Rocket History #124 – Apollo: Astronaut Selection and Training – Part 2

With Group 4, for the first time, the selection criteria did not include a requirement for test pilot proficiency. Selectees who were not qualified pilots would be assigned to the Air Force for a year of flight training. The primary scientific requirement was a doctorate in medicine, engineering, or one of the natural sciences.

Astronaut Group 3

Astronaut Group 3

Astronaut Group 4

Astronaut Group 4

Scientist-Astronaut Harrison Schmitt

Scientist-Astronaut Harrison Schmitt

Jul 30

Space Rocket History #123 – Apollo: Astronaut Selection and Training – Part 1

Selection of Group Two virtually depleted the pool of qualified candidates from the small corps of test pilots in the country, and it was the last group for which test-pilot certification would be a requirement. The new trainees reported to Houston in October 1962 to begin a two-year training course. A four-day work week was normally scheduled, the fifth day being reserved for public relations duties or for travel.

Group 1, The Mercury 7

Group 1, The Mercury 7

Back - See, McDivitt, Lovell, White, Stafford. Front - Conrad, Borman, Armstrong, Young

Back – See, McDivitt, Lovell, White, Stafford. Front – Conrad, Borman, Armstrong, Young

Astronaut Groups 1 and 2

Astronaut Groups 1 and 2