Dec 04

Space Rocket History #91 – The Death of Sergei Pavlovich Korolev – Part 3

Around noon on January 14th, Boris Chertok was alone in his office studying a folder of classified mail that had accumulated during the past few days. He had asked not to be disturbed. Suddenly his subordinate ran in and shouted, “Sergey Pavlovich died!”
Chertok responded “Are you out of your mind? Which Sergey Pavlovich?”
“Ours, our Sergey Pavlovich Korolev! His wife telephoned from the hospital!”
Chertok stood absolutely dumbfounded, having no idea what to do next. This can’t be! This really shouldn’t be happening! A few seconds later he called the Kremlin for verification.

Monument in Moscow

Monument in Moscow

Monument in Korolyov

Monument in Korolyov

Monument in Baykonur

Monument in Baykonur

Nov 26

Space Rocket History #90 – The Death of Sergei Pavlovich Korolev – Part 2

Sergei Korolev’s life paralleled in many ways the life of Wernher Von Braun. Like Von Braun, as a young man, Sergei Korolev was inspired to dedicate his life to the technology for space exploration after becoming acquainted with the work of a great space pioneer: Hermann Oberth in the case of von Braun, and Konstantin Tsiolkovsky in the case of Korolev. Both began their careers in space development through serious study, participation in amateur rocket societies, and then support from the military…

Korolev, Kurchatov, Keldysh

Korolev, Kurchatov, Keldysh

Yuri and Sergei

Yuri and Sergei

Vostok 1 Lauch

Vostok 1 Lauch

Nov 20

Space Rocket History #89 – The Death of Sergei Pavlovich Korolev – Part 1

His power, influence, and responsibilities during the 1950s and 60s were all encompassing. Not only was he in charge of all space-related issues, he was also in charge of some of the design of rockets for military purposes as well. He oversaw the design and testing of communications and surveillance satellites, too. Although he delegated responsibility for each program to trusted designers in separate engineering bureaus, his workload was enormous. He was the responsible for all the programs including the Soviet equivalent of NASA, which was called the Ministry for Medium Machine Building.

Sergei as a Child

Sergei as a Child

Korolev in his 20s

Korolev in his 20s

Korolev in a Glider

Korolev in a Glider

Jul 03

Space Rocket History #69 – Zond 3, Venera 3, and Asterix

The Zond program was one of two lunar exploration programs conducted by the Soviet Union to investigate the Moon and its vicinity. The program began in 1964 and ended in 1979. The early Zond’s 1-3 were originally designed for planetary exploration, while the latter Zonds (4-8) were sent on circum lunar flights. Additionally, the latter Zond vehicles were of a totally different in design. They were in fact automated versions of the manned Soyuz spacecraft…

Zond 3

Zond 3

Far Side of the Moon

Far Side of the Moon

Venera 3

Venera 3

Asterix

Asterix

Diament

Diamant

By Dave.

By Dave.

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Jun 18

Space Rocket History #68 – Gemini VI & VII with Wally Schirra, Tom Stafford, Frank Borman, and Jim Lovell – Rendezvous – Part 4

The Gemini Program was conceived after it became evident to NASA officials that an intermediate step was required between Project Mercury and the Apollo Program. The major objectives assigned to Gemini were:
1-To subject two men and supporting equipment to long duration flights — a requirement for projected later trips to the moon or deeper space.
2-To effect rendezvous and docking with other orbiting vehicles, and to maneuver the docked vehicles in space, using the propulsion system of the target vehicle for such maneuvers.
3-To perfect methods of reentry and landing the spacecraft at a pre-selected land-landing point.
4-To gain additional information concerning the effects of weightlessness on crew members and to record the physiological reactions of crew members during long duration flights.

By Dave.

By Dave.

Helicopter over G6

Helicopter over G6

G6 on USS Wasp

G6 on USS Wasp

G7 Before Splashdown

G7 Before Splashdown

G7 in the Water

G7 in the Water

G7 Crew on Wasp

G7 Crew on Wasp

G7 Crew on Wasp

G7 Crew on Wasp

Welcome Ceremony

Welcome Ceremony

G6 & 7 on Wasp

G6 & 7 on Wasp

Jun 12

Space Rocket History #67 – Gemini VI & VII with Wally Schirra, Tom Stafford, Frank Borman, and Jim Lovell – Rendezvous – Part 3

From the previous episode, we have Gemini VII waiting in orbit for Gemini VI-A to launch and rendezvous.  Remember, Gemini VII could only remain in orbit for 14 days, the maximum duration of its flight.  The goal was to launch Gemini VI-A on or before day 9 of Gemini VII’s mission.

Stafford in G6-A

Stafford in G6A

GT-6A Abort

GT-6A Abort

By Dave

By Dave

GT-6A Launch

GT-6A Launch

G7 viewed from G6A

G7 viewed from G6A

G7 Viewed from G6A

G7 Viewed from G6A

Jun 05

Space Rocket History #66 – Gemini VI & VII with Wally Schirra, Tom Stafford, Frank Borman, and Jim Lovell – Rendezvous – Part 2

From the previous episode, it was decided that the name of Gemini VI would be changed to Gemini VI-a to distinguish it from the originally planned mission whose objective was to rendezvous with the Agena target vehicle. Gemini VII would be launched first before Gemini VI-a and it would be considered the target vehicle effectively replacing the Agena. After Gemini VII lifted off, Gemini VI-a would be transferred to the launch pad and prepared to launch as soon as possible. After Gemini VI-a rendezvoused with Gemini VII, it would return to earth before Gemini VII.

Lovell & Borman

Lovell & Borman

New Suits

New Suits

Boarding

Boarding

GT-7 Launch

GT-7 Launch

The Moon over Earth

G7-Moon over Earth

Mission Patch

Mission Patch

Feb 27

Space Rocket History #52 – Gemini 1 – Test Flight – Part 2

One second after 11 o’clock Wednesday morning, April 8th 1964, the Titan II booster’s first-stage engine ignited. Four seconds later, the 156 ton vehicle lifted from the pad on that curiously lambent flame so distinctive of Titan II’s hypergolic propellants. Within moments, Gemini-Titan 1 vanished into the hot Florida sky, beyond reach of human senses but not electronic sensors. Telemetry data flowed back to mission controllers at the Cape, telling them that the launch was as nearly perfect as it looked.

Gemini 1 Experiment Pallets

Experiment Pallets

Gemini 1 Left Instrument Pallet

Left Instr. Pallet

Gemin 1 Launch

Gemin 1 Launch

Gemini1-1

To the Pad

space rocket history pic69

By Dave

Tang

Celebration Tang